Archive for November, 2014

On Mondays, we moto.
Photos by George Evan 
 INSTA: @GeorgeEvanPhoto, TWEET: @TheGeorgeEvan

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Kent & Curwen Leather Biker Jacket / Gap Gable Sweater / Gap Skinny Jean / ASOS Chelsea Boot / Vintage Felt Fedora

When the temps drop, we don’t immediately run for the long, wool coats (just yet). Opt for a chunky wool sweater and a quality biker jacket to keep out the cold while still looking cool. Take your skinny destroyed jean to a new place with a classic suede Chelsea boot (the go to dress boot for this Fall..trust us).
SHOP THE LOOK HERE:

Fisherman Friday
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For some reason, when most people think of Hemingway, they associate him with great American classics. They are right about one thing — the author did rock the classics —  but we believe that the real time-honored tradition is not a novel, but a sweater.The Fisherman sweater is a staple that every street style savvy, TommyTon Instagram following gent should have in his closet. The cable-knit motif gives this trend more finesse than your typical jumper and comes in a variety of shapes and designs. Choose a heavier piece to wear on its own or opt for a lighter version and layer it underneath a blazer. However you decided to wear this style, make it your own. (We suggest throwing in a few staples like a sick denim jacket, a slim pair of cargos, and a tried & true work boot)

Our top 6 picks, after the jump:

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1) Gap Lambswool Cable-Knit Sweater
2) H&M Cable Knit Sweater
3) L.L.Bean Irish Fisherman’s Crewneck Heritage Sweater
4) J.Crew Italian Cashmere Cable Sweater
5) A.P.C. Cable-Knit Wool Sweater
6) Vince Wool Cable-Knit Sweater

— John Soper
Preston’s Picks
We’re all about mixing high and low over here at Wingtip Jungle, realizing certain items are certainly worth the splurge. When it comes to rugged footwear, no one wants to be left in the cold. For Fall/Winter 2014, we highly suggest investing in a pair of rugged boots that will take you from the subway platform to the office while looking polished and winter-ready. Our go-to pairing? A chunky cable-knit sweater and a slim pair of jeans.

Movember, Mo Beard Maintenance 
As we dive further into the cold autumn season, we encounter another month-long celebration of cancer awareness – Movember.  Starting in Australia in 2003, this initiative is meant to grow consciousness (and hair) of men’s health.

Although we can’t wait to put the razor down for a whole month, we have decided that we can’t let our lip foliage run rampant. So with manes that are bound to be wiry and difficult, we mustache ourselves one question (yeah, we went there): What products will help keep your crumb catchers looking, smelling and feeling great?

To answer this question, we rounded up some of the best brands we could find to keep your partner – and the general public – happy. Top picks, after the jump:

1) Beard oils are essential to every man with fuzzy features. Exposure to daily elements can strip away a beard’s bristles of the protective cuticle. This serum from Brooklyn Grooming ($29) not only gives your whiskers everyday protection, it also moisturizes the skin underneath.

2) Balms work the same way a pomade would for the strands on the top of your head. The Backwoods Beard Balm ($23) will hold that mustache in place (please, no curly handlebars) and instantly make your hair appear thicker.

3) We probably don’t recommend washing your new-found facial hair with a regular shampoo, but luckily for you this Billy Jealousy Beard Wash ($22) will do just the trick. The plant-based ingredients will keep your bristles feeling cleansed and refreshed all day long.

4) Zeus isn’t just the ruler of the Olympian gods, it is also the brand behind the perfect Pear Wood Boar Bristle Brush ($20) to help work out those stubborn tangles and flyways.

5) “Cologne? For your beard?! Now that’s just crazy.” Trust us, it’s a real thing and you’ll love it. Instead of smelling like today’s lunch menu, you’ll be filled with a woodsy, citrus scent with Jao Brand’s BeardScent ($28).

— John Soper